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Dust, Depression and the New Deal: Life in the 1930s

Dust, Depression and the New Deal: Life in the 1930s

The Depression era, also known as the “Dirty Thirties,” was a time of devastating economic and environmental change. For many Americans, the threat of losing their life savings, homes and belongings affected them in a very personal way.
In Salina and surrounding communities, local businesses and families were impacted by the dramatic changes of the 1930s. A new exhibit called Dust, Depression and the New Deal: Life in the 1930s is slated to open in April at the Smoky Hill Museum. It tells the story of two families –– one rural, one city-dwelling –– and how they adapted to make ends meet. From the westward migration of the Okies to FDR’s New Deal and the creation of the WPA and the CCC, the Great Depression left a legacy of resilience and determination that endures even today.
Dust, Depression and the New Deal: Life in the 1930s is on exhibit until February 1, 2015.