Newsroom

Newsroom

If you want to be in the know about what’s going on at our organization, you’ve come to the right place. Be sure to check back regularly to get our latest news updates.

  • Schilling Air Force Base was an important part of Salina, and when it closed in 1965, the community faced an uncertain future. Join Tim Rogers, Executive Director of the Salina Airport Authority, as he explores the events surrounding the closure of Schilling Air Force Base and how housing was used for waiting wives. He’ll also discuss the economic impact of Schilling Air Force Base in 1965 and the Salina Regional Airport and Industrial Center 50 years later.

    This free presentation is offered at the Smoky Hill Museum on Thursday, April 7, from 5:30-6:30 pm.

    The Smoky Hill Museum is a nationally accredited history museum, in the heart of downtown Salina, Kansas. This FREE museum is open Tuesday-Friday 12-6 and Saturday 10-5. Also, be sure to stop by the Museum Store for a wide variety of regional and Kansas products, local artwork and gifts for all ages.

    For needed accommodations, please call Nona Miller at 309-5776 between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Every effort will be made to accommodate known disabilities. For material or speech access, please call at least 5 working days prior to the event.

  • Schilling Air Force Base was an important part of Salina, and when it closed in 1965, the community faced an uncertain future. Join Tim Rogers, Executive Director of the Salina Airport Authority, as he explores the events surrounding the closure of Schilling Air Force Base and how housing was used for waiting wives. He’ll also discuss the economic impact of Schilling Air Force Base in 1965 and the Salina Regional Airport and Industrial Center 50 years later.

    This free presentation is offered at the Smoky Hill Museum on Thursday, April 7, from 5:30-6:30 pm.

    The Smoky Hill Museum is a nationally accredited history museum, in the heart of downtown Salina, Kansas. This FREE museum is open Tuesday-Friday 12-6 and Saturday 10-5. Also, be sure to stop by the Museum Store for a wide variety of regional and Kansas products, local artwork and gifts for all ages.

    For needed accommodations, please call Nona Miller at 309-5776 between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Every effort will be made to accommodate known disabilities. For material or speech access, please call at least 5 working days prior to the event.

  • Match Madness

    The Friends of the Smoky Hill Museum are participating in Match Madness. On March 8, you can designate gifts to our endowed fund at the Greater Salina Community Foundation. Each gift will be matched with a cash grant to our agency to support our work in the community.

    In-person donations will be accepted from 7 a.m.-7 p.m. at Blue Skye Brewery & Eats, 116 N. Santa Fe Ave. On line donations will be matched from 12:00 a.m.–11:59 p.m. at www.gscf.org. Your donation will go a long way in helping us build our endowment. Plus, gifts made on Today, March 8, will be matched up to 50% from a $55,000 matching pool — making your dollars go further!

  • The Common and Quirky Mascots of Kansas

    Join the Smoky Hill Museum as it hosts “The Common and Quirky Mascots of Kansas,” a free presentation and discussion by Jordan Poland on Thursday, March 3 at 5:30 pm. Jordan Poland is the Director of the Kansas Sports Hall of Fame in Wichita. The program is made possible by the Kansas Humanities Council.

    Sports mascots from the Sunflower State come in all shapes, sizes, and colors. From the most recognizable, like KU’s Jayhawk and K-State’s Wildcat, to more obscure mascots like the Fowler Goldbugs and the Hill City Ringnecks, these characters often reflect the history and character of the towns they represent.

    “Mascots are one of the features that distinguish Kansas communities,” said Poland. “It’s not a coincidence that many mascots around the state are represented on their community’s water tower because mascots are an important identifier of who we are and where we come from.”

    “The Common and Quirky Mascots of Kansas” is part of the Kansas Humanities Council’s Humanities Speakers Bureau, featuring presentations and discussions that connect communities with history, traditions, and ideas to strengthen civic life. The event is partially supported by generous gifts from the Johnson County Community College Foundation and the Rotary Club of Shawnee Mission to honor the memory of Fred Krebs, a lifelong advocate of the humanities in Kansas. For more information about KHC programs contact the Kansas Humanities Council at 785/357-0359 or visit online at www.kansashumanities.org.

    For more information about “The Common and Quirky Mascots of Kansas,” contact the Smoky Hill Museum at 785-309-5776 or visit smokyhillmuseum.org.

    The Smoky Hill Museum is a nationally accredited history museum, in the heart of downtown Salina, Kansas. This FREE museum is open Tuesday-Friday 12-6 and Saturday 10-5. Also, be sure to stop by the Museum Store for a wide variety of regional and Kansas products, local artwork and gifts for all ages.

    For needed accommodations, please call Nona Miller at 309-5776 between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Every effort will be made to accommodate known disabilities. For material or speech access, please call at least 5 working days prior to the event.

  • The Vietnam War in Perspective

    Join Dr. Adrian Lewis, as he looks at Vietnam in the context of the Cold War, to learn why the Vietnam War was fought the way it was. Dr. Lewis is a professor at the University of Kansas, teaches at the Naval War College, is an author, a retired soldier and has taught at the United States Military Academy at West Point.

    This free presentation is offered at the Smoky Hill Museum as part of our 1960s Flashback Series, on Thursday, December 3, from 5:30-6:30 pm.

    The Smoky Hill Museum is a nationally accredited history museum, in the heart of downtown Salina, Kansas. This FREE museum is open Tuesday-Friday 12-6 and Saturday 10-5. Also, be sure to stop by the Museum Store for a wide variety of regional and Kansas products, local artwork and gifts for all ages.

  • Poinsettia & Wreath Sale To Benefit Museum

    As the holiday season approaches, it’s time to think about the holiday cheer that the 24th Annual Friends of the Smoky Hill Museum’s Poinsettia & Wreath Sale brings to many. The most beautiful, nursery-quality poinsettias available in the area, the Museum’s Poinsettias are guaranteed to brighten any décor, cheer up loved ones and reduce holiday decorating stress. Also available for pre-order are fresh, long-lasting greenery wreaths handmade by BEL Tree Farm, starting at $20 for a 22-inch wreath.

    Score big holiday points with family and friends by giving one or more gorgeous, locally grown poinsettias as a holiday, housewarming or “just thanks” gift. The lush, 15 to 18-inch small plants are $14 each. The luxurious, 24-inch medium plants are $29. Both options are multi-stem florals with bright blooms available in red, pink, white or burgundy. Also available is the stunning 36-inch large poinsettia, available only in traditional Christmas red, for $40.

    Order 30 or more plants for home, office, church or civic use and take $2 off per plant. Friends of the Smoky Hill Museum members receive an additional $1 per plant or wreath discount. Pick up your plants and wreaths at the Museum on Saturday, December 5 from 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m., to kick-off the holiday season. Delivery to your home, office, church or charitable recipient is just $15 per order in the Salina metro area.
    Your support of the Smoky Hill Museum through the holiday Poinsettia & Wreath program directly supports many educational programs and events for thousands of area children and families. Since the holiday season is almost here, it’s best to order your poinsettias or wreaths today. The last day to order is Saturday, November 14, but some sizes or shades may sell out early. To order, please call 785-309-5776 or visit www.smokyhillmuseum.org to order online.

    When picking up your poinsettias in early December, be sure to browse through the Museum Store for creative holiday gift ideas. From gourmet Kansas food products to local artwork to stunning wheat weaving, the Museum Store has something for everyone. You can even create a custom gift basket for loved ones far and near who may treasure a Kansas reminder.

    Proceeds from Friends fundraising and from the Museum Store support the services, programs and events of the Smoky Hill Museum, a nationally accredited history museum, in the heart of downtown Salina, Kansas. The free-admission museum is open Tuesday-Friday 12-6 and Saturday 10-5.

  • Chili Cook-Off Cancelled, Street Fair to Continue

    Chili Cook-Off Cancelled, Street Fair to Continue

    Smoky Hill Museum Street Fair organizers have made the difficult decision to cancel the Chili Cook-Off scheduled for September 26 citing a lack of entries. “It is a real shame more teams did not enter,” says Susan Hawksworth, museum director. “Those few teams that did enter are very disappointed, as we are sure the general public wishing to taste the chili will be.”
    The main Street Fair itself will still be happening. An action filled day is scheduled starting with the parade down Santa Fe Avenue, two entertainment stages, historic and artistic demonstrators, participatory crafts and activities, food vendors, and the special exhibit The 1960s Part I: Political Power inside the museum. Admission is free to the Street Fair.
    Entertainment is planned on two stages. “The Dock” (east of the museum), a youth/community stage, will feature street magician and escape artist August Gilbreath, the Vodvill Klown, Richard Renner, and Salina’s very own The Lyric Academy of Music.
    The Main Stage (north side of the museum) presents regional musical entertainment featuring Cowgirl’s Train Set, a high-speed, high-octane, all-inclusive folksy, jazzy, boogie, seven-member band from Lawrence and Truck Stop Honeymoon whose music has been billed as “Bluegrass, punk-rock and a palpable dose of soul.” Displaced by hurricane Katrina, Truck Stop Honeymoon now calls Lawrence home.
    Finishing out the day on the Main Stage is a new feature – a spaghetti eating contest sponsored by Martinelli’s Little Italy. Eight contestants will each battle their way through a full order of scrumptious spaghetti to see who can finish first. Several lucky folks will be picked from Martinelli’s facebook page.
    Historic and artistic demonstrators will be on hand from 10:30 am – 4:00 pm as well, featuring weavers, woodworking, soap making, a potter, a mountain man and caricaturists.
    Favorite activities for kids of most ages include free make-and-take crafts, the corn box, and with the purchase of a $5 wristband, they can jump on the inflatables the whole day. And, of course, there will be food.
    Thanks to sponsorships from many dedicated Salina residents and businesses, there is no cost to attend this day of celebration. Watch the museum web site, www.smokyhillmuseum.org, for the most up-to-date information and come celebrate autumn on September 26 at the Smoky Hill Museum Street Fair.
    The museum especially wishes to thank the following generous businesses and organizations for their sponsorship: Salina Downtown Inc., Cox Communications, Mowery Clinic, Rocking M Radio, Sunflower Taxi, Alpha Media Salina/Manhattan, Salina Journal, Mid-Kansas Cooperative and the City of Salina.
    The Smoky Hill Museum is a nationally accredited history museum, in the heart of downtown Salina, Kansas. This FREE museum is open Tuesday-Friday 12-6 and Saturday 10-5. Also, be sure to stop by the Museum Store for a wide variety of regional and Kansas products, local artwork and gifts for all ages.

  • From aviation to Z-Bar Ranch, large alphabet blocks build a story about the Sunflower State. Come, learn and play with us!

  • Give a gift to the Friends of the Smoky Hill Museum and let the Greater Salina Community Foundation make it greater – at Match Madness!

  • The Chili Cook-Off is back by popular demand at this year’s Street Fair!

  • For kids who want more – it’s great to explore!

  • Maximize your gift! Every Dollar goes further on May 6.

  • Community partnerships that strengthen the Museum’s educational impact continue to unfold.

  • Two renewing sponsors — PKM Steel Service and Waddell & Reed, Inc. — are recognized for their respective support of the Industry and Agriculture cases.

  • This Memorial Day, we remember and honor the men and women who have served our country’s armed forces—specifically those who have given the ultimate sacrifice.

  • No matter what your job is, it’s an chance to connect and come together. If you want to use your work for others, check out four ways you can give back at work.

  • How can you celebrate Peace Officers Memorial Day and National Police Week and pay homage to officers around the country? Here are some ideas to get started.

  • Storytelling is powerful, and it has enormous benefits in store for you and those around you. Today we're going to talk about how storytelling can impact your life.

  • Today can be an opportunity to plant the seed of altruism. If you want to make your May Day meaningful, check out these ideas for how to share the gift of altruism today.

  • Paying it forward is a way to spread goodness into the world. If you want to get involved this International Pay It Forward Day, check out these ways to pay it forward.

  • Whether it's a few hours or a long commitment, volunteering not only supports those around you, but positively influences you as well. Here's six ideas to get started.

  • Homelessness is a significant issue which plagues our community and the world. With such a huge challenge, how can we as individuals make a difference?

  • Keep America Beautiful Month is about coming together to give back to our beautiful country. This month, you can try some of these activities to support your community.

  • Despite their age, children can have a powerful impact in the community, if only we encourage them to do so. Here are four reasons kids should start volunteering young.